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My Capulet Girl - part one
I didn’t watch the new version of Romeo and Juliet yet, but I’m totaly in love with this dress!!!

Hailee Steinfeld is really adorable as Juliet in the photos!


And, as I’m a huge fan of Shakespeare and totaly addicted about Romeo and Juliet, I had to do her too! 

I’ve already made almost all of the most signifcative Juliets from the movies! So I’ll try to talk a little bit of all of them soon ;)

by mara sop

My Capulet Girl - part one

I didn’t watch the new version of Romeo and Juliet yet, but I’m totaly in love with this dress!!!

Hailee Steinfeld is really adorable as Juliet in the photos!

And, as I’m a huge fan of Shakespeare and totaly addicted about Romeo and Juliet, I had to do her too! 

I’ve already made almost all of the most signifcative Juliets from the movies! So I’ll try to talk a little bit of all of them soon ;)

by mara sop

My Trastamara’s Girls - Part Seven
Finally finishing the Trastamara’s queens family three, Maria of Spain, Anna and Elisabeth of Austria.

Maria of Spain, Holly Roman Empress

She was the spouse of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Bohemia and Hungary. She was the daughter of Emperor Charles V and Isabella of Portugal, and twice served as regent of Spain.
Maria and Maximiliam had sixteen children during the course of a twenty-eight-year marriage. Among them the Holly Roman Emperors Rudolf II and Matthias III, and the queens Anna and Elisabeth of Austria, the first queen of Spain and the last queen of France.
While her father was occupied with German affairs, Maria and Maximilian acted as regents of Spain from 1548 to 1551 during the absence of Prince Philip. Maria stayed at the Spanish court until August 1551, and in 1552 the couple moved to live at the court of Maximilian’s father in Vienna. During another absence of her brother, now King Philip II, from 1558 to 1561, Maria was again regent of Spain and returned to Madrid during that time.
After her return to Germany, her husband gradually succeeded his father Ferdinand I as ruler of Germany, Bohemia and Hungary, which he ruled from 1564 to his death in 1576. Maria was a devout Catholic and frequently disagreed with her religiously ambiguous husband. She had great influence over her sons, the future emperors Rudolf and Matthias.
c. 1557

Anna of Austria, queen of Spain

She was the eldest daughter of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian II and Maria of Spain, and the fourth and last wife of Phillip II of Spain (the other first two are her cousins, Maria Manuela, daughter of Catherine of Austria; and Mary I of England, daughter os Catherine of Aragon. The third is the french princess Elisabeth of Valois)
Anna was considered her father’s favorite child. The story goes that he enjoyed playing and gambling with her and once a meeting of the Estates of Hungary was postponed because Anna was sick. She received a Catholic education even though her father was sympathetic to Lutheranism.
As the eldest daughter of the Holy Roman Emperor, Anna was a desirable candidate for marriage at the European courts. Her parents thought of a Spanish marriage to strengthen links between the Austrian and Spanish Habsburg families.  Initially she had her cousin Don Carlos of Spain in mind, the only son of her maternal uncle Philip II of Spain, but with the death of Don Carlos and the wife of Phillip, Elisabeth of Valois, the plans had changed, and she married with her uncle.
Besides being her father’s favorite child, Anna was also Philip’s most beloved wife. But the marriage was at first opposed by many, including Pope Pius V. According to diplomats, the king was in love with his young bride.
It was Philip’s fourth marriage, but the king still had no male heir. Anna completed her duties flawlessly in that regard. Not only was she a good stepmother to Philip’s daughters Isabella Clara Eugenia and Catherine Michelle, but she also gave birth to five children, including sons.
She had 4 sons and only one daughter, Maria, but the girl died with only 3 years old.
c. 1571

Elisabeth of Austria, queen of France

She was the wife of King Charles IX, and a member of the House of Habsburg, she was the second favorite daughter of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor. Her Maria of Spain, was daughter of Isabella of Portugal, a descendant of Isabella of Castile. 
With her flawless white skin, long blond hair and perfect physique, she was considered one of the great beauties of the era, and she was just as intelligent and charming as her father. 
After the death of her husband, she returned to Vienna, and lived at first in her childhood home, Schloss Stallburg. On 1576 her beloved father Maximilian II died, and her brother Rudolf II succeeded him as Holy Roman Emperor. Her last great tragedy came on 1578, when her six-year-old daughter Marie Elisabeth died.

When a new proposal of marriage was made to her, this time from King Philip II of Spain after the death of his wife Anna in 1580, she again refused; according to Brantôme, she replied to the offer with the famous phrase: “The Queens of France never remarried” (Les Reines de France ne se remarient point), once said by Blanche of Navarre, widow of King Philip VI.
c. 1573

And now, the complete family three of Trastamara’s queens descendents of Isabella of Castile:

by mara sop

My Trastamara’s Girls - Part Seven

Finally finishing the Trastamara’s queens family three, Maria of Spain, Anna and Elisabeth of Austria.

Maria of Spain, Holly Roman Empress

She was the spouse of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Bohemia and Hungary. She was the daughter of Emperor Charles V and Isabella of Portugal, and twice served as regent of Spain.

Maria and Maximiliam had sixteen children during the course of a twenty-eight-year marriage. Among them the Holly Roman Emperors Rudolf II and Matthias III, and the queens Anna and Elisabeth of Austria, the first queen of Spain and the last queen of France.

While her father was occupied with German affairs, Maria and Maximilian acted as regents of Spain from 1548 to 1551 during the absence of Prince Philip. Maria stayed at the Spanish court until August 1551, and in 1552 the couple moved to live at the court of Maximilian’s father in Vienna. During another absence of her brother, now King Philip II, from 1558 to 1561, Maria was again regent of Spain and returned to Madrid during that time.

After her return to Germany, her husband gradually succeeded his father Ferdinand I as ruler of Germany, Bohemia and Hungary, which he ruled from 1564 to his death in 1576. Maria was a devout Catholic and frequently disagreed with her religiously ambiguous husband. She had great influence over her sons, the future emperors Rudolf and Matthias.

c. 1557

Anna of Austria, queen of Spain

She was the eldest daughter of Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian II and Maria of Spain, and the fourth and last wife of Phillip II of Spain (the other first two are her cousins, Maria Manuela, daughter of Catherine of Austria; and Mary I of England, daughter os Catherine of Aragon. The third is the french princess Elisabeth of Valois)

Anna was considered her father’s favorite child. The story goes that he enjoyed playing and gambling with her and once a meeting of the Estates of Hungary was postponed because Anna was sick. She received a Catholic education even though her father was sympathetic to Lutheranism.

As the eldest daughter of the Holy Roman Emperor, Anna was a desirable candidate for marriage at the European courts. Her parents thought of a Spanish marriage to strengthen links between the Austrian and Spanish Habsburg families.  Initially she had her cousin Don Carlos of Spain in mind, the only son of her maternal uncle Philip II of Spain, but with the death of Don Carlos and the wife of Phillip, Elisabeth of Valois, the plans had changed, and she married with her uncle.

Besides being her father’s favorite child, Anna was also Philip’s most beloved wife. But the marriage was at first opposed by many, including Pope Pius V. According to diplomats, the king was in love with his young bride.

It was Philip’s fourth marriage, but the king still had no male heir. Anna completed her duties flawlessly in that regard. Not only was she a good stepmother to Philip’s daughters Isabella Clara Eugenia and Catherine Michelle, but she also gave birth to five children, including sons.

She had 4 sons and only one daughter, Maria, but the girl died with only 3 years old.

c. 1571

Elisabeth of Austria, queen of France

She was the wife of King Charles IX, and a member of the House of Habsburg, she was the second favorite daughter of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor. Her Maria of Spain, was daughter of Isabella of Portugal, a descendant of Isabella of Castile. 

With her flawless white skin, long blond hair and perfect physique, she was considered one of the great beauties of the era, and she was just as intelligent and charming as her father. 

After the death of her husband, she returned to Vienna, and lived at first in her childhood home, Schloss Stallburg. On 1576 her beloved father Maximilian II died, and her brother Rudolf II succeeded him as Holy Roman Emperor. Her last great tragedy came on 1578, when her six-year-old daughter Marie Elisabeth died.

When a new proposal of marriage was made to her, this time from King Philip II of Spain after the death of his wife Anna in 1580, she again refused; according to Brantôme, she replied to the offer with the famous phrase: “The Queens of France never remarried” (Les Reines de France ne se remarient point), once said by Blanche of Navarre, widow of King Philip VI.

c. 1573

And now, the complete family three of Trastamara’s queens descendents of Isabella of Castile:

by mara sop

My Trastamara’s Girls - Part Six
Ending the line of Trastamara’s queens descendents of Isabella of Castile, we have the daughters of Maria and Catalina (Catherine) of Aragon.
Isabella of Portugal (Maria of Aragon’s Daughter)

Isabella was the second child and eldest daughter of King Manuel I of Portugal and his second spouse, Infanta Maria of Castile and Aragon. She was named after her maternal grandmother, Isabella I of Castile, and her aunt Isabella, Princess of Asturias, who had been her father’s beloved first spouse.
Isabella had 3 children. Phillip II of Spain, the Holy Roman Empress Maria of Portugal and Joanna princess of Portugal.
She died in 1539, so this is a postumos portrait painted 9 years after her death.
And I just realized that I totally forgot of the Holy Roman Empress, the Archduchess Maria of Austria, spouse of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Bohemia and Hungary, and her daughters Anne and Elizabeth of Austria, both queens. WOW!!! I’ll make her soon. I promise! ;)
Isabella’s portrait is from c. 1548
Maria had another daughter, the infanta Beatrice, married with Charles III, duke of Savoy. But she never was a queen neither her descendents.

 
Mary Tudor (Catherine of Aragon’s Daughter)

Queen Mary I of England, or Bloody Mary
Mary was the only surviver daughter of Henry VIII and Catalina de Aragon, and a huge catholic person. She became more famous because of her persecution of protestants during her reign than anything else, so she earned the nickname Bloody Mary.
Mary was a precocious child. Throughout Mary’s childhood, Henry VIII negotiated potential future marriages for her. When she was only two years old, she was promised to the Dauphin, the infant son of King Francis I of France, but the contract was repudiated after three years. In 1522, at the age of six, she was instead contracted to marry her 22-year-old first cousin, Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. However, the engagement was broken off within a few years by Charles with Henry’s agreement.
But with the nullification of the marriage of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, Mary was considerated as bastard.
From 1531 until her mother’s death, Mary was often sick with irregular menstruation and depression, although it is not clear whether this was caused by stress, puberty or a more deep-seated disease. She was not permitted to see her mother, who had been sent to live away from court by Henry.

Mary and her first stepmother, Anne Boleyn, detested each other, and she also hate Katherine Howard, but apparently she got along quite well with Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves and Katherine Parr.
As illegitimate child, Lady Mary loose everything, including her marriages proposals, and only had a new suitor when she was courted by Duke Philip of Bavaria from late 1539, but Philip was Lutheran and his suit for her hand was unsuccessful.
She finally got marriage after being crowned queen. At the age of 37, she married with her cousin Phillip II of Spain, but, but even with several psychological pregnancies, she died childless.

c. 1554
It’s really interesting analize the costumes of the Trastamara Girls to see the versatility of the fashion renaissance. When we think in the renaissance, we automaticaly visualize 3 or 4 especificy outfits, like the mid 1530s Tudor’s fashion, an elizabethan, an italian renaissance, and maybe an iberic style outfit …
And in the House of Trastamara’s fashion we can see the transition between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance even in the 16th century, a huge influence of german renaissance, and of kind of hats, hoods and veils. Is really cool to see it.
by mara sop

My Trastamara’s Girls - Part Six

Ending the line of Trastamara’s queens descendents of Isabella of Castile, we have the daughters of Maria and Catalina (Catherine) of Aragon.

Isabella of Portugal (Maria of Aragon’s Daughter)

Isabella was the second child and eldest daughter of King Manuel I of Portugal and his second spouse, Infanta Maria of Castile and Aragon. She was named after her maternal grandmother, Isabella I of Castile, and her aunt Isabella, Princess of Asturias, who had been her father’s beloved first spouse.

Isabella had 3 children. Phillip II of Spain, the Holy Roman Empress Maria of Portugal and Joanna princess of Portugal.

She died in 1539, so this is a postumos portrait painted 9 years after her death.

And I just realized that I totally forgot of the Holy Roman Empress, the Archduchess Maria of Austria, spouse of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor and King of Bohemia and Hungary, and her daughters Anne and Elizabeth of Austria, both queens. WOW!!! I’ll make her soon. I promise! ;)

Isabella’s portrait is from c. 1548

Maria had another daughter, the infanta Beatrice, married with Charles III, duke of Savoy. But she never was a queen neither her descendents.

 

Mary Tudor (Catherine of Aragon’s Daughter)

Queen Mary I of England, or Bloody Mary

Mary was the only surviver daughter of Henry VIII and Catalina de Aragon, and a huge catholic person. She became more famous because of her persecution of protestants during her reign than anything else, so she earned the nickname Bloody Mary.

Mary was a precocious child. Throughout Mary’s childhood, Henry VIII negotiated potential future marriages for her. When she was only two years old, she was promised to the Dauphin, the infant son of King Francis I of France, but the contract was repudiated after three years. In 1522, at the age of six, she was instead contracted to marry her 22-year-old first cousin, Holy Roman Emperor Charles V. However, the engagement was broken off within a few years by Charles with Henry’s agreement.

But with the nullification of the marriage of Henry VIII and Catherine of Aragon, Mary was considerated as bastard.

From 1531 until her mother’s death, Mary was often sick with irregular menstruation and depression, although it is not clear whether this was caused by stress, puberty or a more deep-seated disease. She was not permitted to see her mother, who had been sent to live away from court by Henry.

Mary and her first stepmother, Anne Boleyn, detested each other, and she also hate Katherine Howard, but apparently she got along quite well with Jane Seymour, Anne of Cleves and Katherine Parr.

As illegitimate child, Lady Mary loose everything, including her marriages proposals, and only had a new suitor when she was courted by Duke Philip of Bavaria from late 1539, but Philip was Lutheran and his suit for her hand was unsuccessful.

She finally got marriage after being crowned queen. At the age of 37, she married with her cousin Phillip II of Spain, but, but even with several psychological pregnancies, she died childless.

c. 1554

It’s really interesting analize the costumes of the Trastamara Girls to see the versatility of the fashion renaissance. When we think in the renaissance, we automaticaly visualize 3 or 4 especificy outfits, like the mid 1530s Tudor’s fashion, an elizabethan, an italian renaissance, and maybe an iberic style outfit …

And in the House of Trastamara’s fashion we can see the transition between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance even in the 16th century, a huge influence of german renaissance, and of kind of hats, hoods and veils. Is really cool to see it.

by mara sop

My Trastamara’s Girls - Part Five
The youngest daughters of Juanna of Castile
Mary of Hungary

She was queen consort of Hungary and Bohemia as the wife of King Louis II, and was later Governor of the Habsburg Netherlands.
Mary married King Louis II of Hungary and Bohemia in 1515. Their marriage was happy but short and childless. Upon her husband’s death following the Battle of Mohács in 1526, Mary governed Hungary as regent in the name of the new king, her brother, Ferdinand I.
In 1531, Mary was asked by her eldest brother, Emperor Charles V, to assume the governance of the Netherlands and guardianship over their nieces, Dorothea and Christina of Denmark, upon the death of their aunt Margaret. As governor of the Netherlands, Mary faced riots and a difficult relationship with the Emperor. Throughout her tenure she continuously attempted to ensure peace between the Emperor and the King of France. Although she never enjoyed governing and asked for permission to resign several times, the Queen succeeded in creating a unity between the provinces, as well as in securing for them a measure of independence from both France and the Holy Roman Empire. After her final resignation, the frail Queen moved to Castile, where she died.
c. 1519

Catherine of Portugal

She was the wife of King John III of Portugal. She was also the Regent of Portugal during the minority of her grandson King Sebastian of Portugal from 1557 until 1562. 
Her story was really sad. Catherine was the posthumous daughter of Philip of Hapsburg by Juanna of Castile She was born in Torquemada and remained with her disturbed mother until the arrival in Spain from Flanders of her eldest siblings, Eleanor of Austria and the future Emperor Charles V.
All of her five older siblings, except Ferdinand, were born in the Low Countries and had been put into the care of their aunt Margaret of Austria, but Juanna kept hold of her young daughter Catherine. Catherine actually stayed with her mother in her prison cell during her grandfather’s time as regent. Catherine and two ladies-in-waiting stayed with Joanna.
Catherine had nothing to do all day, except to look out of the window. Later she and her mother were freed from confinement.
Catherine married her first cousin, King John III of Portugal. They had nine children, but only two survived early childhood. Her daughter, Maria Manuela of Portugal died 4 days after given birth to her only son, Don Carlos, prince of Asturias.

After the death of her husband in 1557, Catherine was challenged by her daughter-in-law and niece, Joan of Austria, over the role of regent for her grandchild, the infant King Sebastian. Mediation by Charles V resolved the issue in favour of his sister Catherine over his daughter Joan, who was needed in Spain in the absence of Philip II.
She then served as the regent of Portugal from 1557 until 1562. In 1562, she turned over the regency to Henry of Portugal.
She was named in honor of her maternal aunt, Catherine of Aragon, first wife of King Henry VIII of England.
c. 1552
by mara sop

My Trastamara’s Girls - Part Five

The youngest daughters of Juanna of Castile

Mary of Hungary

She was queen consort of Hungary and Bohemia as the wife of King Louis II, and was later Governor of the Habsburg Netherlands.

Mary married King Louis II of Hungary and Bohemia in 1515. Their marriage was happy but short and childless. Upon her husband’s death following the Battle of Mohács in 1526, Mary governed Hungary as regent in the name of the new king, her brother, Ferdinand I.

In 1531, Mary was asked by her eldest brother, Emperor Charles V, to assume the governance of the Netherlands and guardianship over their nieces, Dorothea and Christina of Denmark, upon the death of their aunt Margaret. As governor of the Netherlands, Mary faced riots and a difficult relationship with the Emperor. Throughout her tenure she continuously attempted to ensure peace between the Emperor and the King of France. Although she never enjoyed governing and asked for permission to resign several times, the Queen succeeded in creating a unity between the provinces, as well as in securing for them a measure of independence from both France and the Holy Roman Empire. After her final resignation, the frail Queen moved to Castile, where she died.

c. 1519

Catherine of Portugal

She was the wife of King John III of Portugal. She was also the Regent of Portugal during the minority of her grandson King Sebastian of Portugal from 1557 until 1562. 

Her story was really sad. Catherine was the posthumous daughter of Philip of Hapsburg by Juanna of Castile She was born in Torquemada and remained with her disturbed mother until the arrival in Spain from Flanders of her eldest siblings, Eleanor of Austria and the future Emperor Charles V.

All of her five older siblings, except Ferdinand, were born in the Low Countries and had been put into the care of their aunt Margaret of Austria, but Juanna kept hold of her young daughter Catherine. Catherine actually stayed with her mother in her prison cell during her grandfather’s time as regent. Catherine and two ladies-in-waiting stayed with Joanna.

Catherine had nothing to do all day, except to look out of the window. Later she and her mother were freed from confinement.

Catherine married her first cousin, King John III of Portugal. They had nine children, but only two survived early childhood. Her daughter, Maria Manuela of Portugal died 4 days after given birth to her only son, Don Carlos, prince of Asturias.

After the death of her husband in 1557, Catherine was challenged by her daughter-in-law and niece, Joan of Austria, over the role of regent for her grandchild, the infant King Sebastian. Mediation by Charles V resolved the issue in favour of his sister Catherine over his daughter Joan, who was needed in Spain in the absence of Philip II.

She then served as the regent of Portugal from 1557 until 1562. In 1562, she turned over the regency to Henry of Portugal.

She was named in honor of her maternal aunt, Catherine of Aragon, first wife of King Henry VIII of England.

c. 1552

by mara sop

My Trastamara’s Girl - Part Four
As her mother, Juanna had 4 daughters, all queens!

Eleonor of Austria

Eleanor was the eldest child of Philip of Austria and Juanna of Castile, and was an Archduchess of Austria and Infanta of Castile from the House of Habsburg, and subsequently became Queen consort of Portugal as the wife of Manuel I of Portugal (1518–1521) and of France as the wife of Francis I of France (1530–1547). She had only one daughter, Maria of Portugal, Duchess of Viseu. Maria was born on 1521 in Lisbon. In the same year, her father died and her step-brother John III became king. Shortly afterwards, Maria’s mother, the dowager queen Eleanor, returned to her brother’s court in Vienna, taking Maria with her.

In 1530, Eleanor married King Francis I of France and moved to France. Maria would not see her mother for nearly 28 years. Meanwhile, in 1525, Eleanor’s younger sister (Maria’s aunt) Catherine had married Maria’s step-brother John III of Portugal. At some point, Maria moved from Vienna to Lisbon. She was to live in Portugal, at the court of her step-brother and his family, for the rest of her life.
Maria died unmarried and childless.
Eleonor’s portrait was painted by Joos von Cleve when she already was queen of France, in 1530.

Isabella of Austria

Isabella of Austria was an archduchess of Austria and infanta of Castile and Aragon, was Queen of Denmark, Sweden and Norway as the wife of King Christian II, she also served as regent of Denmark in 1520.
Isabella had 2 daughters, Dorothea and Christina.
Dorothea of Denmark and Norway, electress of the Palatinate as the wife of Elector Frederick II of the Palatinate. 

As the eldest surviving child of the abdicated Christian II, Dorothea had a claim to the Danish, Norwegian and Swedish throne. The Habsburg family selected Frederick of the Palatinate to be her consort as they believed that he could successfully claim the Danish throne through marriage. She married Frederick in 1535 in Heidelberg. They had no children.
Christina of Denmark, Duchess-consort of Milan, then Duchess-consort of Lorraine.


She was also the Regent of Lorraine in the years 1545–1552 during the minority of her son and a claimant to the thrones of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

After Jane Seymour, the third wife of Henry VIII, died in 1537, Christina was considered as a possible bride for the English king. The German painter Hans Holbein was commissioned to paint portraits of noblewomen eligible to become the English queen.Christina, then only sixteen years old, made no secret of her opposition to marrying the English king, who by this time had a reputation around Europe for his mistreatment of wives. She supposedly said, “If I had two heads, one should be at the King of England’s disposal.”
Isabella’s painting is from c. 1520

My Trastamara’s Girl - Part Four

As her mother, Juanna had 4 daughters, all queens!

Eleonor of Austria

Eleanor was the eldest child of Philip of Austria and Juanna of Castile, and was an Archduchess of Austria and Infanta of Castile from the House of Habsburg, and subsequently became Queen consort of Portugal as the wife of Manuel I of Portugal (1518–1521) and of France as the wife of Francis I of France (1530–1547). She had only one daughter, Maria of Portugal, Duchess of Viseu. Maria was born on 1521 in Lisbon. In the same year, her father died and her step-brother John III became king. Shortly afterwards, Maria’s mother, the dowager queen Eleanor, returned to her brother’s court in Vienna, taking Maria with her.

In 1530, Eleanor married King Francis I of France and moved to France. Maria would not see her mother for nearly 28 years. Meanwhile, in 1525, Eleanor’s younger sister (Maria’s aunt) Catherine had married Maria’s step-brother John III of Portugal. At some point, Maria moved from Vienna to Lisbon. She was to live in Portugal, at the court of her step-brother and his family, for the rest of her life.

Maria died unmarried and childless.

Eleonor’s portrait was painted by Joos von Cleve when she already was queen of France, in 1530.

Isabella of Austria

Isabella of Austria was an archduchess of Austria and infanta of Castile and Aragon, was Queen of Denmark, Sweden and Norway as the wife of King Christian II, she also served as regent of Denmark in 1520.

Isabella had 2 daughters, Dorothea and Christina.

Dorothea of Denmark and Norway, electress of the Palatinate as the wife of Elector Frederick II of the Palatinate. 

As the eldest surviving child of the abdicated Christian II, Dorothea had a claim to the Danish, Norwegian and Swedish throne. The Habsburg family selected Frederick of the Palatinate to be her consort as they believed that he could successfully claim the Danish throne through marriage. She married Frederick in 1535 in Heidelberg. They had no children.

Christina of Denmark, Duchess-consort of Milan, then Duchess-consort of Lorraine.

She was also the Regent of Lorraine in the years 1545–1552 during the minority of her son and a claimant to the thrones of Denmark, Norway and Sweden.

After Jane Seymour, the third wife of Henry VIII, died in 1537, Christina was considered as a possible bride for the English king. The German painter Hans Holbein was commissioned to paint portraits of noblewomen eligible to become the English queen.Christina, then only sixteen years old, made no secret of her opposition to marrying the English king, who by this time had a reputation around Europe for his mistreatment of wives. She supposedly said, “If I had two heads, one should be at the King of England’s disposal.”

Isabella’s painting is from c. 1520

My Trastamara’s Girls - Part Three
Isabella of Castille had 4 daughter, the 1st and the 3nd was queen of Portugal, but her most famous daughters are Juanna of Castille and Catherine of Aragon.

Juanna of Castille or Juanna la Loca

Juana became known as Juanna la Loca (Joanna the Mad), because of her emotional disorders, which worsened with the affairs of her husband, Philip the Handsome, by whom she was completely in love.
Most historians now agree that she had melancholia, severe clinical depression, a psychosis, or a case of inherited schizophrenia. There is debate about the diagnosis that she was mentally ill considering that her symptoms were aggravated by non-consensual confinement and control by others who had assumed her royal powers.
c. 1500

Catherine of Aragon (Catalina de Aragon), queen of England

Catalina de Aragon as princess of Wales, when she still was married with prince Arthur, Henry VIII’s older brother and heir of english throne until his death. She became queen of England by her marriage with Henry VIII. Henry divorced her to marry Anne Boleyn. She and Henry was Queen Mary I’s parents.
As I relied on a picture of only her face, I used as reference, the dresses Elizabeth of York (her mother-in-law) and Isabella of Castile (her mother) to can make the skirt.

I was wondering make a real version of Catalina, since only had done the Tudor’s show version. Catalina was red, not brunet, and how I made her mother, sisters and daughter as red, it would be really weird if just she didn’t was according with she really was.
The 1st fanart was inspired in one of her most famous portraits when she stillwas just princess of Wales as wife of prince Arthur Tudor (c. 1502), and 2nd fanart was inspired in a George Stuart’s wax figure when she already was queen of England as the first wife of Henry VIII (c. 1530).
c. 1530
In the next posts we’ll see Juanna’s daughters

by mara sop

My Trastamara’s Girls - Part Three

Isabella of Castille had 4 daughter, the 1st and the 3nd was queen of Portugal, but her most famous daughters are Juanna of Castille and Catherine of Aragon.

Juanna of Castille or Juanna la Loca

Juana became known as Juanna la Loca (Joanna the Mad), because of her emotional disorders, which worsened with the affairs of her husband, Philip the Handsome, by whom she was completely in love.

Most historians now agree that she had melancholia, severe clinical depression, a psychosis, or a case of inherited schizophrenia. There is debate about the diagnosis that she was mentally ill considering that her symptoms were aggravated by non-consensual confinement and control by others who had assumed her royal powers.

c. 1500

Catherine of Aragon (Catalina de Aragon), queen of England

Catalina de Aragon as princess of Wales, when she still was married with prince Arthur, Henry VIII’s older brother and heir of english throne until his death. She became queen of England by her marriage with Henry VIII. Henry divorced her to marry Anne Boleyn. She and Henry was Queen Mary I’s parents.

As I relied on a picture of only her face, I used as reference, the dresses Elizabeth of York (her mother-in-law) and Isabella of Castile (her mother) to can make the skirt.

I was wondering make a real version of Catalina, since only had done the Tudor’s show version. Catalina was red, not brunet, and how I made her mother, sisters and daughter as red, it would be really weird if just she didn’t was according with she really was.

The 1st fanart was inspired in one of her most famous portraits when she stillwas just princess of Wales as wife of prince Arthur Tudor (c. 1502), and 2nd fanart was inspired in a George Stuart’s wax figure when she already was queen of England as the first wife of Henry VIII (c. 1530).

c. 1530

In the next posts we’ll see Juanna’s daughters

by mara sop

My Trastamara’s Girls - Part Two

Newly I posted the Trastamara’s Family Three, and talked a little about the matriarch, Isabella of Castille.
Now I’ll introduce two of her daughters, both queens of Portugal and wives of King Manuel I.

Isabella de Aragon, princess of Asturias and queen of Portugal.

She was the first daughter and heiress of Ferdinand de Aragon and Isabella de Castile, and the beloved first wife of portuguese King Manuel I.
In 1490 Isabella married Afonso, Prince of Portugal, the heir of John II of Portugal. Though it was an arranged marriage, Isabella and Afonso quickly fell in love, and Isabella was grief-stricken when he died in 1491: sent home to her parents by John II, she declared that she would never marry again and would enter a convent. Her parents ignored this, and in 1497 she was persuaded to marry Manuel I of Portugal, Afonso’s uncle and John II’s cousin and successor. She did so on condition that Manuel follow her parents’ religious policy and expel Jews who would not convert to Christianity from his realm. This he duly did. In the same year, Isabella became Princess of Asturias and heiress of Castile following the death of her only brother John and the stilbirth of his daughter.
Was really hard find good images to make her, the only one where she appears in full body, she’s on her back, so to make her headdress I used a drawing of her that certainly is from ten years after the model of the dress.
c. 1485

Maria de Aragon, queen of Portugal

She was the second daughter of Ferdinand de Aragon and Isabella de Castile, and the second wife of portuguese King Manuel I.
As an infanta of Spain, her hand in marriage was very important in European politics. Before her marriage to Manuel I of Portugal, her parents entertained the idea of marrying her off to King James IV of Scotland. This was at a time when her younger sister Catherine’s marriage to Arthur, Prince of Wales, was being planned. Ferdinand and Isabella thought if Maria was Queen of Scotland, the two sisters could keep the peace between their husbands. These plans, however, came to nothing. Her eldest sister Isabella, Princess of Asturias, was the first wife of Manuel I, but her death in 1498 created a necessity for Manuel to remarry. Maria became the next bride of the Portuguese king, reaffirming dynastic links with Spanish royal houses. 
Manuel and Maria were married in 1500, and had 10 children, eight of whom reached adulthood, including King John III of Portugal, Holy Roman Empress Isabella of Portugal, and Beatrice, Duchess of Savoy.
c. 1505
In the next post we’ll see the two must famous daughters of Isabella of Castile, Juanna and Catalina.
by mara sop

My Trastamara’s Girls - Part Two

Newly I posted the Trastamara’s Family Three, and talked a little about the matriarch, Isabella of Castille.

Now I’ll introduce two of her daughters, both queens of Portugal and wives of King Manuel I.

Isabella de Aragon, princess of Asturias and queen of Portugal.

She was the first daughter and heiress of Ferdinand de Aragon and Isabella de Castile, and the beloved first wife of portuguese King Manuel I.

In 1490 Isabella married Afonso, Prince of Portugal, the heir of John II of Portugal. Though it was an arranged marriage, Isabella and Afonso quickly fell in love, and Isabella was grief-stricken when he died in 1491: sent home to her parents by John II, she declared that she would never marry again and would enter a convent. Her parents ignored this, and in 1497 she was persuaded to marry Manuel I of Portugal, Afonso’s uncle and John II’s cousin and successor. She did so on condition that Manuel follow her parents’ religious policy and expel Jews who would not convert to Christianity from his realm. This he duly did. In the same year, Isabella became Princess of Asturias and heiress of Castile following the death of her only brother John and the stilbirth of his daughter.

Was really hard find good images to make her, the only one where she appears in full body, she’s on her back, so to make her headdress I used a drawing of her that certainly is from ten years after the model of the dress.

c. 1485

Maria de Aragon, queen of Portugal

She was the second daughter of Ferdinand de Aragon and Isabella de Castile, and the second wife of portuguese King Manuel I.

As an infanta of Spain, her hand in marriage was very important in European politics. Before her marriage to Manuel I of Portugal, her parents entertained the idea of marrying her off to King James IV of Scotland. This was at a time when her younger sister Catherine’s marriage to Arthur, Prince of Wales, was being planned. Ferdinand and Isabella thought if Maria was Queen of Scotland, the two sisters could keep the peace between their husbands. These plans, however, came to nothing. Her eldest sister Isabella, Princess of Asturias, was the first wife of Manuel I, but her death in 1498 created a necessity for Manuel to remarry. Maria became the next bride of the Portuguese king, reaffirming dynastic links with Spanish royal houses. 

Manuel and Maria were married in 1500, and had 10 children, eight of whom reached adulthood, including King John III of Portugal, Holy Roman Empress Isabella of Portugal, and Beatrice, Duchess of Savoy.

c. 1505

In the next post we’ll see the two must famous daughters of Isabella of Castile, Juanna and Catalina.

by mara sop

My Trastamara’s Girls - Part One
Do you remember of my Trastamara Family Tree?
Of course the family isn’t totaly complete, but I’ve done all the Trastamara’s queens after Isabella of Castile.

Isabella of Castille - The Matriarch

Isabella of Castile, also known as Isabel “the Catholic”, queen of Castile and Leon, was one of the most important queens of history, she and her husband, Ferdinand II of Aragon, brought stability to the kingdoms that became the basis for the unification of Spain.
Isabella and Ferdinand are known for completing the Reconquista, ordering conversion or exile of their Muslim and Jewish subjects and financing Christopher Columbus’ 1492 voyage that led to the opening of the “New World”.
c. 1492

All her daughters were queens!
Isabella and Maria are queens of Portugal, Juanna heir the throne of Castile by her mother, and Catalina (Catherine of Aragon) was queen of England.
I’m making a lot of posts about this family tree, taking 2 queens in each post. So, come back later ;)
by mara sop

My Trastamara’s Girls - Part One

Do you remember of my Trastamara Family Tree?

Of course the family isn’t totaly complete, but I’ve done all the Trastamara’s queens after Isabella of Castile.

Isabella of Castille - The Matriarch

Isabella of Castile, also known as Isabel “the Catholic”, queen of Castile and Leon, was one of the most important queens of history, she and her husband, Ferdinand II of Aragon, brought stability to the kingdoms that became the basis for the unification of Spain.

Isabella and Ferdinand are known for completing the Reconquista, ordering conversion or exile of their Muslim and Jewish subjects and financing Christopher Columbus’ 1492 voyage that led to the opening of the “New World”.

c. 1492

All her daughters were queens!

Isabella and Maria are queens of Portugal, Juanna heir the throne of Castile by her mother, and Catalina (Catherine of Aragon) was queen of England.

I’m making a lot of posts about this family tree, taking 2 queens in each post. So, come back later ;)

by mara sop

My Ghirlandaio’s Girls
Domenico Ghirlandaio is one of my favorite artists ever! And the Capella Tornabuoni’s frescoes can be considered as his masterpiece!
So I made 3 of my favorite Ghirlandaio’s Girls. The first one is his muse Giovanna (degli Albizzi) Tornabuoni, from “The Nativity”. 

Giovanna is the gorgeous young wife of Lorenzo Tornabuoni, son of Giovanni Tornabuoni the head of the family.
Ghirlandaio immortalized her also in the painting “Portrait of Giovanna Tornabuoni”, one of his most famous artworks.

The second is, possibly, a Medici lady, maybe Lorenzo’s older daughter, Lucrezia. Since the Tornabuonis and the Medicis had a lot of marriages between the families, and a lot of Medici members are in the frescoes, is very presumptive the girl close to Clarice Orsini (Lorenzo’s wife) and Lucrrezia Tornabuoni (Lorenzo’s mother) is a Medici girl. But I can’t be sure of that, I’m still researching about it.
The fresco is “Birth of the Baptist”

The last one is the young Ludovica Tornabuoni, a 13 years old daughter of Messer Giovanni Tornabuoni, from “The Birth of Mary”.

Did you like my Ghirlandaio’s girls? I love this artist so much, so it’s very possible that I’ll make a lot of more of his ladies ;)
c. 1488
by mara sop

My Ghirlandaio’s Girls

Domenico Ghirlandaio is one of my favorite artists ever! And the Capella Tornabuoni’s frescoes can be considered as his masterpiece!

So I made 3 of my favorite Ghirlandaio’s Girls. The first one is his muse Giovanna (degli Albizzi) Tornabuoni, from “The Nativity”. 

Giovanna is the gorgeous young wife of Lorenzo Tornabuoni, son of Giovanni Tornabuoni the head of the family.

Ghirlandaio immortalized her also in the painting “Portrait of Giovanna Tornabuoni”, one of his most famous artworks.

The second is, possibly, a Medici lady, maybe Lorenzo’s older daughter, Lucrezia. Since the Tornabuonis and the Medicis had a lot of marriages between the families, and a lot of Medici members are in the frescoes, is very presumptive the girl close to Clarice Orsini (Lorenzo’s wife) and Lucrrezia Tornabuoni (Lorenzo’s mother) is a Medici girl. But I can’t be sure of that, I’m still researching about it.

The fresco is “Birth of the Baptist”

The last one is the young Ludovica Tornabuoni, a 13 years old daughter of Messer Giovanni Tornabuoni, from “The Birth of Mary”.

Did you like my Ghirlandaio’s girls? I love this artist so much, so it’s very possible that I’ll make a lot of more of his ladies ;)

c. 1488

by mara sop

My Tolstoy Girl

Today is Leo Tolstoy 186th birthday, so let’s toast with a Anna Karenina’s fanart! 


Cheers!!!

by mara sop

My Tolstoy Girl

Today is Leo Tolstoy 186th birthday, so let’s toast with a Anna Karenina’s fanart! 

Cheers!!!

by mara sop

Happy Birthday to Bess and Nan !!!

Yes, today is Elizabeth I’s birthday, and I call her Bess because is her nickname, as Nan is Anne Boleyn’s ;)

by mara sop

Happy Birthday to Bess and Nan !!!

Yes, today is Elizabeth I’s birthday, and I call her Bess because is her nickname, as Nan is Anne Boleyn’s ;)

by mara sop

My Da Vinci’s Girls
Leonardo da Vinci is one of my favorites artists ever!

So I have this “project” to make a fanart of his muses. 
I started with the most famous Lisa Gherardini, Cecilia Gallerani, Cecilia Gallerani and Lucrezia Crivelli, but I still will make Ginevra di Benci, Isabella d’Este and Bianca Maria Sforza ;)
Lisa Gherardini - The Monalisa!

The Mona Lisa (Monna Lisa or La Gioconda) is a half-length portrait of a woman by the Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci, which has been acclaimed as “the best known, the most visited, the most written about, the most sung about, the most parodied work of art in the world.” 
c. 1503

Cecilia Gallerani - The Girl with an Ermine

Cecilia Gallerani was the favourite and most celebrated of the many mistresses of Ludovico Sforza, known as Lodovico il Moro, Duke of Milan. She is best known as the subject of Leonardo da Vinci’s painting The Lady with an Ermine (circa 1489). While posing for the painting, she invited Leonardo, who at the time was working as court artist for Sforza, to meetings at which Milanese intellectuals discussed philosophy and other subjects. Cecilia herself presided over these discussions. 
c. 1489

Lucrezia Crivelli - La Belle Ferronnière

Lucrezia Crivelli, La Belle Ferronnière from Da Vinci’s painting. She was a lady-in-waiting to Ludovico Sforza’s wife, Beatrice d’Este. During this time, she also became the mistress of Sforza. In 1497, she gave birth to his son, Giovanni Paolo. Sforza’s affair with Crivelli caused much distress to his wife, who was considered accomplished and cultured. Upon learning of the affair, d’Este tried without success to have Crivelli banished from court.
c. 1490

The future Da Vinci’s Girls I’ll make!

Ginevra di Benci

Bianca Maria Sforza

Isabella d’Este

by mara sop

My Da Vinci’s Girls

Leonardo da Vinci is one of my favorites artists ever!

Leonardo da Vinci self portrait

So I have this “project” to make a fanart of his muses. 

I started with the most famous Lisa Gherardini, Cecilia Gallerani, Cecilia Gallerani and Lucrezia Crivelli, but I still will make Ginevra di Benci, Isabella d’Este and Bianca Maria Sforza ;)

Lisa Gherardini - The Monalisa!

Monalisa

The Mona Lisa (Monna Lisa or La Gioconda) is a half-length portrait of a woman by the Italian artist Leonardo da Vinci, which has been acclaimed as “the best known, the most visited, the most written about, the most sung about, the most parodied work of art in the world.” 

c. 1503

Cecilia Gallerani - The Girl with an Ermine

Cecilia Gallerani

Cecilia Gallerani was the favourite and most celebrated of the many mistresses of Ludovico Sforza, known as Lodovico il Moro, Duke of Milan. She is best known as the subject of Leonardo da Vinci’s painting The Lady with an Ermine (circa 1489). While posing for the painting, she invited Leonardo, who at the time was working as court artist for Sforza, to meetings at which Milanese intellectuals discussed philosophy and other subjects. Cecilia herself presided over these discussions. 

c. 1489

Lucrezia Crivelli - La Belle Ferronnière

Lucrezia Crivelli

Lucrezia Crivelli, La Belle Ferronnière from Da Vinci’s painting. She was a lady-in-waiting to Ludovico Sforza’s wife, Beatrice d’Este. During this time, she also became the mistress of Sforza. In 1497, she gave birth to his son, Giovanni Paolo. Sforza’s affair with Crivelli caused much distress to his wife, who was considered accomplished and cultured. Upon learning of the affair, d’Este tried without success to have Crivelli banished from court.

c. 1490

The future Da Vinci’s Girls I’ll make!

Ginevra di Benci

Ginevra di Benci

Bianca Maria Sforza

Bianca Maria Sforza

Isabella d'Este

Isabella d’Este

by mara sop

My Tudor Girls Family Tree

You can see it better here!

by mara sop

My Fairy Tale’s Weaver Girl

Sorcha of Sevenwaters (or Jenny of Harrowfield) from the book Daughter of the Forest (Juliet Marillier) is a young irish girl living with the bretons when she weaves the startwort shirts to break the spell that transformed her six brothers into swans (the book is inspired on the fairy tale of “The Six Swans” amazingly mixed with Irish legends).

The startwort plants and flowers that she used to spin the magical shirtshad thorns that hurt and disfigured her hands.

I won this book as birthday gift from a dearest friend, and now I’m dying toread the whole series.

As the romance takes place in the beggining of King Aethelwulf of Wessex reign, I believe the approximate date is circa of 840.by mara sop

My Fairy Tale’s Weaver Girl

Sorcha of Sevenwaters (or Jenny of Harrowfield) from the book Daughter of the Forest (Juliet Marillier) is a young irish girl living with the bretons when she weaves the startwort shirts to break the spell that transformed her six brothers into swans (the book is inspired on the fairy tale of “The Six Swans” amazingly mixed with Irish legends).

The startwort plants and flowers that she used to spin the magical shirtshad thorns that hurt and disfigured her hands.

I won this book as birthday gift from a dearest friendand now I’m dying toread the whole series.


As the romance takes place in the beggining of King Aethelwulf of Wessex reign, I believe the approximate date is circa of 840.

by mara sop

My Sorceress Girl

I just finished my Lady Oonagh (from Sevenwaters Trilogy by Juliet Marillier), and I’m very happy with the result!

Lady Oonagh is the powerful sorceress from Sevenwaters Trilogy by Juliet Marillier.

She is very evil, and want to destroy the Sevenwaters people, and take control of the feud through her son Ciáran, the 7th son of a 7th son, and just because of that a really powerful man!

To achieve their goals, she turns the 6 older children of her husband into swans. Sorcha, the only girl,  manages to escape, and Lady Oonagh starts to chase her to destroy her before she can break the curse.

I’ve already made Sorcha (Daughter of Forest), and her daughters Niamh and Liadan (Son of the Shadows), and now I’ll make Fainne (Child of Prophecy), Niamh’s daughter. ;)

c. 838

by mara sop

My Sorceress Girl

I just finished my Lady Oonagh (from Sevenwaters Trilogy by Juliet Marillier), and I’m very happy with the result!

Lady Oonagh is the powerful sorceress from Sevenwaters Trilogy by Juliet Marillier.

art by Dunechampion on DeviantArt

She is very evil, and want to destroy the Sevenwaters people, and take control of the feud through her son Ciáran, the 7th son of a 7th son, and just because of that a really powerful man!

art by Jenimal on DeviantArt

To achieve their goals, she turns the 6 older children of her husband into swans. Sorcha, the only girl,  manages to escape, and Lady Oonagh starts to chase her to destroy her before she can break the curse.

I’ve already made Sorcha (Daughter of Forest), and her daughters Niamh and Liadan (Son of the Shadows), and now I’ll make Fainne (Child of Prophecy), Niamh’s daughter. ;)

c. 838

by mara sop

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